Sky Chart for Rural and Relatively Dark Suburbs

Sky Charts for Rural and Relatively Dark Suburbs

Note that the fainter stars in the “sickle” of the constellation Leo will be hard to see with the light of the bright Moon, less than 4 days past full, even in the darkest (less light-polluted) locations; the star at the top of the sickle is the faintest and likely not visible. But if the sky is very clear and you have good eyesight, you can see it and some fainter stars than are shown below.

For a printer-friendly version of the chart (inverted colors, black stars on a white background), click here.

You won’t see the names, or any lines, in the sky. What you will really see is more like the second view (but short red lines mark Regulus; of course, they won’t be in the sky). Printer-friendly versions of both charts (inverted colors, black stars on a white background) are at the bottom (the short “Regulus” marks are blue).

Click on any chart for a larger view of it.

Computer friendly version for your eyes

 

ErgoF3lb

Sky chart for rural and relatively dark suburbs with labels

ErgoF3ub

Sky chart for rural and relatively dark suburbs

Printer friendly version (save your ink!)

 

ErgoF3l

Sky chart for rural and relatively dark suburbs – printer friendly with labels.

ErgoF3u

Sky chart for rural and relatively dark suburbs – printer friendly.