Regulus 2014 Sky Charts

Finding The Right Star in the Sky

Given today’s typical light-polluted environment, the biggest challenge for many observers may be simply confirming that the star at which they are looking in the sky is in fact Regulus.  The sky charts linked from this page should help you find and confirm the identity of the star.  However, don’t be afraid to ask for help from people you know who might have more familiarity with the night sky.  Having someone point out Regulus with a green laser pointer (whose beam is visible to anyone standing close to the person holding it) will dispel all doubt!

On March 20th at any time from 1:30am EDT until the occultation, an easy way to find Regulus is to face the Moon and stretch your arms out horizontally to the side.  Turn your head to the right and sight along your right arm. Regulus will be directly above your right hand, about the same distance above the horizon that the Moon is above the horizon (that is, both will be about halfway from the horizon to directly overhead). Regulus will be the brightest star in that part of the sky.

For charts of the sky as seen from strongly light-polluted city environments, click here.

For charts of the sky as seen from light-polluted suburbs, click here.

For charts of the sky as seen from rural or relatively dark suburbs click here.

For charts of the sky as seen from good (dark) sky conditions click here.